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Concurrent - Demystified

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Combo, Consecutive, Class within a Class, Concurrent 

Terminology Demystified.

 

Concurrent - What does it really mean? 

 

Concurrent is a word that you might hear as people talk about running two or more classes together.  Technically, the word "Concurrent" just means "together" - which is the reason that it is being to describe two very different things.

In an effort to clear up the confusion - let's not use the word Concurrent to describe anything.  Let's clarify how classes get entered and how classes are run using different terminology.

 

Entry Method - how an exhibitor is able to enter a class.

Stand Alone - Riders can enter a class all on its own.  1 entry = 1 horse or rider - we don't care how the class is run.

Class Within a Class / Sub-Class - Limited Age Events do this all the time - but it typically isn't done at a Weekend / Championship show.   A Class Within A Class / Sub-Class is where a rider is REQUIRED to enter one class in order to then enter another.  Example of this is a Senior World Tour - a rider must enter the Non Pro in order to then enter the SWT Non Pro.  When it comes to any of the Championship classes, do not make any of the classes a Sub-Class of another - except when it is a Senior World Tour class. 

Combo - If a rider enters two or more classes but only goes to the herd 1 time - it is called a Combo.  Example, at NCHA Triple Crown events, eligible riders can enter the Amateur and the Intermediate Amateur levels with 1 trip to the herd, that is called a combo.  They pay 2 jackpots, but only 1 office fee.  At a Weekend / Championship show, the only way this can occur is if two classes are run using the Combo method - outlined below. 

Running Method - how classes are run in a set (or sets) of cattle. 

Stand Alone - Each class has its own set or sets of cattle.  The only class that runs is that one. Judge's sheets only have 1 class on them.  This is how most Weekend / Championship classes are currently run.

  • 1 set of cattle
  • 1 judge card

Consecutive - This is where you use 1 set of cattle and have multiple classes run using that same set of cattle - but they run IN ORDER.  All of the first class runs, no cattle change, all of the second class runs, no cattle change, etc.  Example:  You have 3 riders in the 35K Non Pro and 4 riders in the $15K Amateur. You put 18 head of cattle in the arena.  The judge has 2 sheets, 1 for the 35K Non Pro, 1 for the $15K Amateur.  The 3 - 35K Non Pro riders show first, then the 4 - $15K Amateur riders show.  7 runs total on that set of cattle from 2 classes.  Any rider that has entered both classes walks to the herd TWO times - therefore pays 2 jackpots, 2 office charges, 2 cattle charges, 2 video fees, etc.  Some people call this "Combined" - but it should not be confused with the Combo method.

  • 1 set of cattle
  • 2 judge cards (1 for each class)

Integrated / Drawn Together This is where you use 1 set of cattle and have multiple classes run using that same set of cattle - but in this case the riders are all jumbled together.  Using the same example as above, there are 7 entries that need to go in the set, 3 from the 35 and 4 from the 15. Instead of having the 2 classes go one after another, you draw all 7 entries randomly - all mixed together.  There are still 18 head of cattle, but the judge only has 1 score sheet.  The secretary / show software will break the riders/horses into placings for the respective classes.  As with the Consecutive method, any rider that has entered both classes walks to the herd TWO times and pays 2x all the fees.  It is completely possible that one rider might draw back to back.  Not an ideal situation.

 

  • 1 set of cattle
  • 1 judge card (secretary breaks out classes / placings)
  • 1 trip to the herd for EACH entered class
  • 1 set of fees for each trip to the herd

Combo - This is where you use 1 set of cattle and have multiple classes run using that same set of cattle - but the difference here is that IF a rider is eligible for multiple classes with that set of cattle, they can choose to walk ONCE to the herd and have that score count for both classes.  They can still enter classes individually, but if the classes are being run using the Combo method, entering both classes means only 1 trip to the herd.  Using that same example, the 4 riders that are entered in the 15K Amateur - they are all eligible for the 35K Non Pro.  2 of them choose to enter the 35K class with a "COMBO" entry.  So here, instead of 7 goes, there are only 5.   A sample draw might look something like this:

Draw 1 - Rider entry = 15Am only
Draw 2 - Rider entry = 35K AND 15Am
Draw 3 - Rider entry = 35K only
Draw 4 - Rider entry = 15Am only
Draw 5 - Rider entry = 35K AND 15Am

When you run two or more classes with the Combo method, and a rider enters 2 classes with 1 go - there should be only 1 video charge, only 1 cattle charge, only 1 office charge.  But there will be 2 jackpot / add back fees, 2 NCHA fees (if it is a Weekend / Championship show).    

  • 1 set of cattle
  • 1 judge card (secretary breaks out classes / placings)
  • 1 trip to the herd regardless of the number of classes entered
  • 1 Jackpot for EACH class entered, but only 1 video, 1 cattle, 1 office set of fees for each trip to the herd

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